Trying it Without an Attorney During the Federal Disability Retirement Process

I get calls all the time by people who tell me that they thought their particular Federal Disability Retirement case was a “slam dunk”; that the medical documentation was there; that everything looked like it should be approved at the first level.  Then, there are people who tell me the same thing after the second, Reconsideration denial — that he or she thought it should definitely pass through.  But law, and especially administrative law before the Office of Personnel Management, has peculiarities beyond a surface, apparent reality.

There is a process and a methodology of obtaining disability retirement. Can a federal retirement attorney guarantee the success of a disability retirement application?  No.  Does an individual applicant have a better chance with the assistance of an attorney who specializes in medical retirement law?  In most cases, yes.  Aren’t there applicants who file for medical retirement, without the assistance of an attorney, who are successful?  Yes.  Should everyone who files for federal retirement hire an attorney?  Not necessarily.

When I speak to a client, I try and place him or her on a spectrum — and on one side of that spectrum is an individual who works at a very physical job, and who has such egregious physical medical disabilities; on the other side of the spectrum is an individual who suffers from Anxiety, who works in a sedentary administrative position (please don’t misunderstand — many people who suffer from anxiety fall into the “serious” side of the spectrum, and I am in no way attempting to minimize the psychiatric disability of Anxiety).

Most people, of course, fall somewhere in the middle.  Yes, I have told many people to go and file his or her disability retirement application without an attorney.  There are those cases which are so egregious, in terms of medical conditions, that I do not believe than an attorney is necessary.  However, such instances are rare.  Thus, to the question, Should everyone who files for Federal retirement under FERS & CSRS hire an attorney?  Not necessarily — but in most cases, yes.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

CSRS & FERS Disability Retirement: Other Stories of Success

There are obviously many, many pitfalls in the attempt to obtain disability retirement benefits from the Office of Personnel Management. Sometimes, I get calls from individuals who tell me that they “heard from a friend” that another employee prepared the disability retirement packet him/herself, and got it through within ___ months (you can fill in the blank with an unbelievably low number — say, 1, 2 or 3), and that there was no need for an attorney, and so why should anyone need an attorney?

I really have no response for such an inquiry; I am always suspicious of such “too good to be true” stories, but on the other hand, inasmuch as I don’t have any facts to refute or otherwise disbelieve such stories, I cannot comment on them.  I can only convey facts, circumstances, and experiences which I have with my own clients (don’t worry — all information received from and on behalf of my clients is protected by attorney-client confidentiality, and I never — ever — divulge personal information; I relate such experiences only in a generic sense, with no names ever mentioned), and indeed, each case is different and unique, and I try and treat each case based upon the specific facts, circumstances, and individual complexities inherent in each.

I really cannot comment on “that other story” that is heard through a chain of mouths and ears, only to be transformed into an unidentifiable success story.

People who come to me and ask for my legal guidance and expertise know that, to the extent I am able, I will answer each question based upon my professional experience; that I try to give a realistic assessment of each case, without embellishment; and my clients remain my clients for life.  Indeed, I get calls almost every week from people who I represented many, many years ago.  If a Medical Questionnaire is received, I am here to guide the recipient so that he/she will be able to retain the disability retirement benefits we fought so hard to obtain.  I have no idea about those “other success stories”; my goal is to satisfy the legal needs of my clients — those who have entrusted their cases in me, and for whom I have a special care and trust for.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

FERS & CSRS disability retirement: When & how to act

When people call me to ask if they need legal representation in filing for disability retirement benefits under FERS or CSRS, I try and provide as “objective” an opinion on the matter as possible. I represent hundreds of people in filing for, and obtaining, disability retirement benefits; it is my specialty, and it is how I make a living. At the same time, however, I believe that I can be completely honest in providing guidance as to whether an individual should obtain legal representation, or needs to obtain representation.

For instance, for individuals who have already sent in their disability retirement packets to OPM (via the Agency for those still on the rolls; directly to Boyers, PA for those who have been separated from service for 31 days or more), I normally advise the applicant to wait — wait until a decision has been rendered, and hopefully the individual will not have to expend the funds for attorneys fees, and an approval will be in the mail. On the other hand, every now and then, an applicant who is waiting for a decision from the Office of Personnel Management, will describe the content and substantive materials comprising the disability retirement packet, and certain statements — during a telephone consultation with me — concerning what is stated in the applicant’s Statement of Disability, will give rise to concern, and in those instances, it may be wise to either withdraw the application, or immediately take steps to supplement the disability retirement packet.

Each FERS or CSRS disability retirement packet is unique, because each individual & individual’s medical condition is unique. That’s what makes the practice of law in the field of representing Federal and Postal disability retirement applicants so interesting, and so professionally satisfying.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire