OPM Disability Retirement: The New Year

The New Year is always a time of reflection, resolutions, and an insight as to how quickly time passes by. It seemed like yesterday that we were all amazed that we were entering the “Twenty-First Century”. In a span of a single year, circumstances change; people and perceptions become altered; friends and co-workers seemingly become transformed into strangers; and medical conditions which yesterday appeared irrelevant, contained or able to be endured, suddenly take on a life of its own.

Medical conditions are a reality which cannot be ignored. Then, of course, there is the problem of a medical condition, its impact upon one’s life, one’s employment, and one’s ability or inability to have an acceptable “quality of life” — as distinct from being able to convey a description of a medical condition in order to qualify for FERS & CSRS disability retirement benefits. It is in the describing of a medical condition, and the practical impact upon one’s employment, which is the key to Federal Disability Retirement benefits under FERS & CSRS. There is a distinction between the reality of a medical condition, and the ability to describe it to an impervious and implaccable agency — the Office of Personnel Management. Many think that, because one suffers from a medical condition, that it is enough to become eligible for disability retirement benefits. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire

Federal Disability Retirement: Decisions before the New Year

Just before the New Year, the Office of Personnel Management tends to overload on making decisions on the initial application of a FERS or CSRS disability retirement application.

If the decision is positive, it is indeed good news, and a great Christmas present.  If the decision is a denial, it is time to immediately set aside any temporary moods of depression, and recognize that, in taking into account the Christmas & Holiday seasons, the delays in the mail system, and the fact that the date of the denial letter may already be weeks old, you only have thirty (30) days from the date of the denial letter to file a Request for Reconsideration.

Timing is always important, and submitting the request in a timely manner, and beginning work on gathering the additional medical documentation is important, especially in light of the “shortened” period of response-time precisely because of the Holidays, Christmas, New Years, etc.  Procrastination will not help one’s case; one needs to be “business-like” and move forward to affirmatively take it to the next level, for the next fight with OPM.

Sincerely,

Robert R. McGill, Esquire